Helgi Tomasson to Retire in 2022

After nearly 40 years of leading the San Francisco Ballet, Helgi Tomasson is retiring. Helgi Tomasson has made the San Francisco Ballet a world-class company, and arguably the best school in the country. For more about his career and his interview check out the Sf Chronicle Here.

Photo: Helgi Tomasson has served as artistic director and principal choreographer for the San Francisco Ballet since 1985.Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

The Less Common Arabesques

In America, we often forget about the last three arabesques. It is also probably why people in Europe think we don’t teach real ballet. (I imagine every teacher in America right now being like, “I’m a great teacher and I teach real ballet because I teach the fourth arabesque.” The fourth Arabesque in the Italian pedagogy Cecchetti, is often referred to as croisé arabesque in America. While in this drawing she is wrist and that left arm is rather high, this arabesque requires a good amount of flexibility in the upper back and shoulders to create the opposition needed. While this arabesque is more turnout friendly than the position’s counterpart (second arabesque), this arabesque is equally unforgiving because of the supporting leg.

Then we have the Russian fourth arabesque, while some Americans might refer to it as epaulé, and others will call it other things. Regardless, of what you call this position, it is one of the hardest positions of the arabesque because you can hide nothing. The back is fully exposed, meaning the spinal and scapula alignment must be properly aligned or it is a dead giveaway. Whether it is done de coté or effacé this position should be trained religiously because this position reinforces the ideas of opposition, and the hips being square while the upper body spirals. The demand for turnout on the supporting leg is also a lot, so if you do not have the strength yet, stick to the first arabesque, and then when you are ready, flip it.

Lastly, the Italian fifth arabesque. It might also be the crowning glory of arabesque. While third arabesque is nice and all, fifth arabesque is probably the most stunning line one’s body can make it, It is this radial pinwheel of perfection when aligned properly. It is the combination of the limbs crossing, the working leg crossing the axis, the supporting leg twisting en decors, while the supporting shoulder is rotating the opposite direction. This position is killer if one can achieve the line. Keep the energy pushing away from your axis and core, reaching to all points of the kinesphere.

More body positions: https://aballeteducation.com/the-body-positions-of-ballet/

For more posts on arabesque: click here.

Understanding Arabesque

People ask us all the time how arabesque works, or why do all of the Clinic girls have such clean and high arabesque lines. The answer isn’t as easy as saying, “We just work the line.” To understand arabesque is to understand body mechanics, shape/line, and body potential. Ballet, classical ballet, as much as it is defined by the body’s turnout, is really defined by arabesque. It is the position most equated with ballet, and the position that all dancers are judged on. With auditions season upon us, and the 2021 audition season roaring in like a tsunami with no relief, I thought I would write some of the thoughts down regards to arabesuqe.

I think one of the biggest misconceptions or verbal corrections passed down through the generations is, “Lean forward.” It is really, really, really misleading, especially for a child’s brain, and spatial awareness. We obviously don’t want to create pinching in the back or pressure in the spine, but leaning forwards is probably not the best way to describe the sensation that happens in the core.

To really understand the classical arabesque line, you have to really understand your own body it’s turnout capability. Lifting the leg isn’t the right set of words to achieve the line either. I always like to say, “rotate the leg off the floor,” The leg spirals ups and into the hip socket to create stability and height, without gripping the glutes. If the glutes (specifically the major) grip the leg won’t go up. If the abs are gripped and clenched it will also prohibit the leg from going up. The core has to be engaged, but engaged properly, “Belly button to the spine.” As the leg rotates up, the pubic bone releases, and the psoas and hip flexor push away, the ribs disengage and the back presses forward (specifically the same side as the working leg) to create opposition.

Placement of the arms always depends on the line and the body. While classical ballet calls for the arm to be more forward, a more open shoulder line creates a less severe look and more natural ease. Too open shortens the leg and causes the scapula to pinch, but a too forward arm creates the visual illusion of your hand being larger than your head.

Another issue when attempting an arabesque is understanding the pelvis. The pelvis can only tilt as much as the core is strong enough to sustain stability. I think kids get too excited and let the hips tip from the neutral position too fast, or optionally opening the hip to get the leg up. This creates a lot of problems, but most importantly, trying to tip the hips to get that hypermobile arabesque line can be dangerous. If you are hypermobile and your body (specifically back) does allow you to achieve a hypermobile backline, you will need to cross-train extra hard and strengthen the core and back times 10.

Kyrie Brizendine, of the Ballet Clinic fully allowing her pelvis to tilt forward to achieve a hyper mobile line.
Taylor Cary, The Ballet Clinic

Here is a young student on pointe. While her body shows a tremendous amount of potential, we can see that her back is still not strong enough to stay as lifted as it should be. Being able to use the back to hold the spine (including the neck) in a straight line takes time. But the turnout and the pelvis placement is correct. The feet need to get stronger, and the so do the back of the legs, but it is age (young 12) appropriate. In another case, using Leonidas as an example, of a 13 year old boy’s arabesuqe line.

Here, you can see that on his flat arabesque he is maintaining the rotation of his supporting leg, staying lifted, and his arm is more forward. His arm is higher because of the height of his leg to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing line for his body type. In his relevé photo, his supporting leg is less turned out due to his inner thigh being weak. But, he is working on it. Ideally, his arm line is now more open s o he can have a more lifted look on relevé and a cleaner backline. But his pelvis placement is still forward, and his torso is forward while the spine is almost straight.

Hope this all helps.

Oh audition photo trick. When taking your audition photos, rotate the shoulder closest to the camera down slightly so that it creates a longer neckline, and visually places the shoulder down. Another audition photo trick: have the camera at the same level as the hips, not the face, it creates a more accurate representation of your body proportions. If you are going to have the camera any lower, it will distort the face and neck.

www.TheBalletClinic.com

Here are the first three arabesques.

For more posts on arabesque:
https://aballeteducation.com/2014/10/19/arabesque/
https://aballeteducation.com/2017/04/03/notes-on-the-ideal-arabesque-getting-it-higher-part-1/

Looking Back at 2020

It is that time of year, the end of the year, but what is usually a time of reflection and growth seems to be overshadowed by the gloom, hatred, and uncertainty of 2021. Most everyone right now can’t wait for 2021, the new year bringing a sense of hope for the future, that all of the negativity is going to stay in 2020, and I hope that too… While the world of Instagram and social media is having everyone repost their highlights of the year and their top 9 (don’t get me wrong, I did it too), I actually had to take a step back and be thankful for this year. First, let me thank all of you for your continuous support, readership, and following. This year we have donated over $30,000 in scholarships/company donations/causes and have given away over $5,000 in products and gift cards to amazing brands.

Evelyn Lyman, The Ballet Clinic, photographed by Ashley Lorraine Baker

This year I had a lot to be thankful for… In January I was as happy as a clam, minding my own business, teaching, hanging out, and trying to start settling down in Scottsdale. We had our Winter Intensives, and we started the choreography for our June Show. In February we did our Valentine’s Day shoot and I took kids to compete at the YAGP Semi-Final New York. In March, I went to Kansas City’s YAGP Semi-Final. By March 16th, we were at home on quarantine orders, and everything completely shifted into chaos and the new normal…

But during quarantine, I was able to focus a lot on A Ballet Education, I had so much free time since I was not in the studio or guest teaching. When things started to go sideways, I decided to make a planner that would help all of my students keep track of Zoom Codes and staying in shape. Little did I know that it was going to explode and that by May 2020, we would have shipped over 1,000 planners worldwide.

Additionally, Ashley and I were able to refocus our efforts on the Magazine and bring on Elizabeth Weldon to help create a stunning issue that would continue to grow throughout the rest of the year.

Issue 19

By June 2020, we were back in the studios, without masks. We were told it was safe, and things were slowing down. Little did we know that would only last two weeks before we were back to stay-at-home orders. By August, we were back in studios but were only allowed to have six kids at a time, and so we were putting in 10 hour days trying to see all of our students at least once a day. Then, by September, we were told we would be allowed to open again with masks… And so, Season two of the Ballet Clinic Resumed, our faculty had expanded from three to six, and our student population had grown from 12 to 32, and we published the beautiful September Issue.

Ginabel Peterson, Jazz Bynum, Katlyn Addison, and Gabrielle Salvatto of Ballet West photographed by Joshua Whitehead.

Our season kicked off to a great start.

In October, we launched the ABE Merch Line along with our Spooky Season Stuff!

By December, we were back in the full swing of things. The magazine has grown, the ABE Merch was taking off, the planners are still going like hotcakes, and our December Issue had come out.

Person using a laptop computer from above

Another new challenge that December brought was live broadcasting our exams at The Ballet Clinic. It was a very fun new challenge, but we were able to produce amazing live streams and broadcast the exams so parents could see.

So as you can see, I have a lot to be thankful for this year. And while this year brought chaos, destroyed the world of arts, and financially broke the system, it also brought me passion, it brought creativity, it brought me the willingness to fight and keep going for everything I love so much. This year has been hell, this year has been a shit storm, but this year has also made me work even harder, and reminded me that nothing is guaranteed. This year has given me amazing collaborations with Tea Leaves and Co, NG Generation and Grishko World, Cary Conservatory, Elite Classical Coaching, winning outstanding teacher at YAGP, being listed as one of the top ballet schools in the country, being nominated for Influential Contributor and Influencer, and so much more.

As I move on to 2021, I am excited for the next year. I am excited for The Ballet Clinic Season 3. I am excited to see what the future holds for my students, and I am excited that A Ballet Education, A Ballet Magazine, A Ballet Network, The Ballet Clinic, and The Pointe Shoe Clinic are thriving.

So peace out 2020. It has been real.


David JW King
www.Davidjwking.com
www.ABalletEducation.com
www.ABalletMagazine.com
www.ABalletNetwork.com
www.TheBalletClinic.com
www.ThePointeShoeClinic.com


The Ballet Clinic Season 3

We are excited to announce Season 3 of The Ballet Clinic!! This last season has been insane, and while COVID-19 has created numerous issues, we are lucky enough to have survived and thrived. This 2020-2021 Season has been crazy, but we have already been awarded numerous awards and recognized for our outstanding and dedicated faculty. We are extremely excited to announce next season as we start our search for the next 36 dancers who will be a part of The Ballet Clinic. Here are some of the photos from this Fall Season! We are so excited to be moving on to our Winter 2021 Season!! To learn more about Season 3 or The Ballet Clinic visit our Website: www.TheBalletClinic.com

KATHRYN MORGAN LIVE TONIGHT!

While A Ballet Magazine’s Winter Issue features a plethora of holiday performances this season, we would be remiss not to also highlight Municipal Ballet Company’s upcoming film of River of Rosewater, their version of The Nutcracker. Based in Salt Lake City, Utah, and under the Directorship of Sarah Longoria (a contributor to our Summer Issue), Municipal Ballet Company has brought entertaining and affordable, if not free, performances to the city for the past nine years. This year’s filmed performance of River of Rosewater features the lovely Kathryn Morgan as Clara, and Christopher Sellars, her current boyfriend and former first soloist with Ballet West, as her prince. 

The performance is set in Salt Lake City’s historic McCune Mansion and accompanied by Pixie and the Party Grass Boys, a local band, who arranged Tchaikovsky’s score. The music, setting, and elegant costumes reflect the air of the 1920s. This version is a charming rendition of the classic Nutcracker and one where Morgan and Sellars are sure to shine. There couldn’t be a more perfect pairing for this unique holiday tale. 

Morgan, who has charmed followers the internet over with her resiliency and candor, continues to impress fans with her reinventions. I am delighted at the thought of seeing her timeless beauty and grace in this performance as she partners with her real life love. Sellars is not only a refined genuine gentleman but also a gifted partner. Together, they and the delightful dancers of Municipal Ballet are sure to sweep the audience off their feet!

Municipal Ballet Company is a collection of classically trained dancers who wish to continue sharing their love of dance. Sarah Longoria has created a beautiful and supportive community for adult dancers to keep dancing and have the opportunity to collaborate with local creatives.  

The filming of River of Rosewater is made possible by Social Antidote, a local nonprofit organization intent on featuring local creatives. Free streaming will premiere Wednesday, (TODAY!!!) December 23rd at 7pm on Social Antidote’s Youtube Channel and will continue to be available to watch. 

By Elizabeth Weldon, Editor-in-Chief, A Ballet Magazine

A Ballet Magazine | Issue 21: The Holiday Issue

IN THIS ISSUE

This amazing issue brings you amazing and beautiful content from Elizabeth WeldonAshley Lorraine BakerDavid KingEric Hipolito Jr  Jillian Verzwyvelt and more! So what is in our Holiday Issue?

The Holidays Reimagined our coverstory featuring interviews with Houston BalletBoston Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet.

Dance and Media featuring New York City Ballet’s Emily Kitka and her business KW CREATIVE

The Perfect Black Leotard, finding the right leotard for you.

Menswear featuring amazing these amazing brands: Boys Dance Too, Barreto Dancewear, Lucky Leo  Elevé Dancewear, and Tightans featuring Ballet Arizona’s Serafin Castro.

Balancing College and Priouettes by Eric Hipolito Jr. Here he talks to dancers Kiara Felder of Les Grand Ballet de Canadian, Montreal, Andy Garcia of Boston Ballet, and PNB’s Genevieve Waldorf

Jillian Verzwyvelt talks about Transferable Skills You Can Take Beyond the Studio. Jillian talks to four amazing women who have transitioned from ballet: Miko Fogarty, Jessica Columbus, Melody Lynch, and Cristina Milanes.

And So Much More!!!

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE ON JOOMAG

ABE 26 DAYS OF THANKS

With the world being full of chaos, and social media constantly perpetuating so many different feelings… we decided to focus our energies on being thankful.

Each day leading up to Thanksgiving we have made a prompt. You can either make a post of your own or comment on our post. Either way, you will be entered into our Christmas Giveaways. This is already on top of our Friday Giveaways!!! If you didn’t know, on Friday’s we like to give stuff away on Instagram live.

Feel to join in at anytime!! #abe26daysofthanks

Just some of the awesome things we are giving away!!!

Why Dancers Should Be Financially Compensated for Social Media

Every time I am about to start a blog post, the world we live in drastically changes, thus causing me to reevaluate what I post. In the latest post, I was going to be writing about Ballet West returning to the stage but this morning Utah put a limit to no more than 10 on social gatherings. So, I am assuming this is going to affect Ballet West’s return to the stage.

Meanwhile, across the world YAGP has successfully hosted the international heats, while the American heats are up in the air and this overwhelming case of uncertainty gives me anxiety.

Like most schools and companies across the US, this pandemic has ravaged business, destroyed dreams, and plagued students. 

The efforts of mask wearing is exhausting, but in my experience works extremely well. But, not everyone in the dance world wants to follow suit, which is totally fine. Everyone is entitled to run their business how they see fit, this isn’t a political post. 

But for me personally, the pandemic has taken its toll on my soul. The art and world that I love so dearly is crumbling. The uncertainty of ballet companies being able to hire over the next three years is grim. The possibility that every pre-professional school will be flooding their programs for dollars, when it’s time to re-open is very high. And ballet companies seem to not want to reinvent themselves during this time, leaving them institutions of the past.

Dancers have this way of living in the past, reminiscing about “the good days,” and have this inherent love for nostalgia. Remembering the Balanchine Era or the Ballet Russes era, the power houses of that brought down the house of the 80’s, the technicians and tricksters of the 90’s, and the primas of the early 00’s. Each of these times seem to be revisited, talked about, and glorified. But it’s time to move on and look forward if we want to save the art and world we live in.

So, what is next?

Ballet and being relatable. There are dancers of this generation making ballet accessible and relatable- but it seems their employers don’t want to recognize or finance their efforts. In today’s world of Instagram and Social Media influencers, there is an affiliates program. Programs that you make money off of when you are responsible for a lead or sale. While I see these dancers attempting to help their organizations, most aren’t being compensated for it. And yes, it is a team effort to save these organizations that we all love so much, but dancers should be compensated for the work that they are doing. 

Crowdfunding and sourcing is a big part of today’s world, and it would be more effective for ballet companies if companies were more accessible but the reality is that these companies aren’t accessible, the dancers are. 

Then you have influencers who are not affiliated with companies that are doing exceptional things, and they should be compensated as well. There are individual artist platforms like Patreon that help individual artists thrive to create digital media content. But, collectively, being conscious that the world we love so much isn’t progressing because of executive directors, but because individual people, dancers, and influencers keep creating content that is relevant. 

These individuals on Instagram are literally the mouthpiece and physical representation of these organizations. What would ABT or PNB be without their star-studded rosters? And these social media superstars are the driving force behind asking for donations. I see all these dancers advertising their digital seasons, asking for donations, and even seeing the links in their profiles. They should have affiliate links, so companies can track who is bringing in what. It’s not that hard to create individually tracked links. But, if their world is out of touch with how social media works… well they can call me 🙂

Lastly, in this ever-changing world, a thought that has been constantly on my mind is…. Are unions like AGMA and the theatre union helping or hindering ballet?

What are your thoughts?

TILER PECK’S: A NEW STAGE

As ballet evolves through this time of COVID, some institutions and individuals have evolved as innovators, while others have slipped into an even more archaic and dated state. New York City Ballet’s Tiler Peck has leapt ahead of the industry. 

In addition to consistently teaching an open class on her Instagram Live feed during Quarantine, Peck teamed up with LA-based CLI Studios to produce a new digital performance. For those unfamiliar, CLI Studios is a digital dance streaming service that is popular among competitive studios and dancers for its access to competitive choreographer content.

A New Stage” was created by Peck as a front-row experience presented by world-class dancers and some of the most highly profiled collaborators. The $20 streamed performance includes names like Lil Buck, Sierra Boggess, Brooklyn Mack, and the Syncopated Ladies. 

Tiler Peck in Christopher Wheeldon’s Unusual Way. Photo Courtesy of CLI Studios

The broadcast is introduced by Peck and then moves into Unusual Way by the award-winning Christopher Wheeldon. Of course the ballet world knows who he is, but for the commercial world, it presented a tremendous introductory effort. This piece entailed a pointe solo by Peck accompanied by vocals sung by Broadway star Sierra Boggess. The slow and romantic movement showcased Peck in a softer presence than her typical portrayal with City Ballet. The piece was delicate and approachable, and definitely created a diverse audience-friendly contemporary ballet that felt welcoming to everyone.

The tap ensemble Syncopated Ladies, then presented its spectacular offering, Amplified. This piece was vibrant, clear, and a true reflection of our times. It transcended the obvious use of popular music, and truly offered something we don’t see often enough in the world of concert dance: high caliber, technical, and clean tap. It wasn’t a part of a Broadway show, it wasn’t a part of a competition showcase, and it wasn’t trying to be a ground breaking percussive performance. Instead, this performance was purely about the tapping, and the people performing. There were multiple body types, ethnicities, and individual artists amongst these delightfully talented women.  In today’s world, where ballet struggles between elitism and accessibility, the Syncopated Ladies’ performance truly was a punch of power, hope and progress for the world of dance.

Finally, the evening concluded with the big performance: Petrushka Reimagined. Petrushka originally premiered in 1911 with the Ballet Russes. It was choreographed by Fokine to Stravinsky, who had in 1910, just premiered his score to the ballet, Firebird. Originally, this ballet was supposed to be Rite of Spring for Diaghilev, but Stravinsky wasn’t feeling it at the time and composed the score around a puppet. 

As this ballet is really intended for a more sophisticated ballet audience, each version that was subsequently created was condensed, and the score cut down and simplified by Stravinsky himself.

An updated Petrushka was previously premiered in 2009 by the Scottish Ballet, and in 2012 a small company in Florida also premiered a Petrushka interpretation with hip-hop, but used a full cast instead of limiting the piece to 3 dancers. This version was definitely more audience friendly, and probably suited the wider commercial audience it was created to entertain. The dancing was great, however the choreography held this piece back from realizing its full potential. With such a capable cast, it was disappointing to find it not as complex or developed as it should have been.

This presentation was based on the later version featuring Nureyev, which only requires 3 dancers. Lil Buck was featured as Petrushka (the puppet), Tiler Peck as the ballerina, and Brooklyn Mack as the Moore. The performance drew from hip hop, pop-locking, vogueing, classical ballet, and contemporary ballet. While I appreciated the choreographer, Jennifer Weber’s, take of Petrushka, the actual sadness, darkness, and complexity of the original ballet is missing, and the focus is not on Petrushka but on Peck’s ballerina doll and a love triangle that is portrayed through elaborate commercial dance. 

Overall, the entire evening was beautifully filmed and crafted and is a great exposure opportunity for younger audiences. Older audiences could appreciate Weber’s Petrushka as one of the only ballets where the male characters are more developed and portray a wider range of emotions. As a commercial introduction to the world of concert dance, this performance checked all of the right boxes: diversity, technique, modernity, and entertainment…but, the $20 was worth it for Syncopated Ladies alone!  Check out the performance here.

CLI’s next performance will include a world premiere by William Forsythe and Tiler Peck. Stay tuned for more.

Boo! It’s Spooky Season!

Seven super cute costume ideas that you probably already have around the house.

This year, instead of illustrating the week of Spooky Season, I asked my students to recreate my illustrations. They definitely went all-in on it, and here they are, just in time for the spooky holiday.

Kathryn Morgan on her departure of Miami City Ballet

So Kathryn Morgan just opened up, and just put Miami City Ballet on Blast. 

Her story was super publicized, and in fact, maybe Miami City Ballet used her for just that: Her public forum. Did Miami City Ballet use her as a stunt to help save their company’s reputation, and do it for the look of “diversity and acceptance” … In her video, she talks about the pressures that the company put on her about her body: she is a size 2. Her video talks about the bullying that happens by the artistic staff, and the pressures that they put on you. Is it even worse because the Artistic Director is female, and a woman requiring the body type? For someone who has worked hard for years to get back in shape, and get to a point where she can dance in a company again… to be told she wasn’t an inspiration? Sounds fishy to me. The crazy part about this video is she doesn’t make any excuses for herself and presents both sides of the executive/artistic staff and her own personal endeavors. So, what did we learn from this video? Miami City Ballet’s reputation of being progressive, and equal, and diverse is basically a facade.

Did you watch the video? What are your thoughts? 

Growing Up Black by Lauryn Brown

When I was younger, kids in my ballet class were awarded stickers for coming to class in the proper uniform with their hair in a neat ballet bun. My mom arranged my thick natural hair into individual braids that were nicely pulled back for class, however, I was the only girl who did not get a sticker for being in the proper uniform. I was always told my hair was not right for the class. Eventually, I told my mother about the issue. We met with the director who apologized, and I finally got my stickers. This experience was traumatizing for me. It could have deterred my interest in this art form. Ballet schools must be more accepting of the cultural and racial differences of their students. The ballet community should accommodate hairstyles for Black dancers who have beautiful, naturally coarse hair. Training to be a professional ballerina is challenging and takes a lot of discipline, regardless of who you are. Read more in our September Issue.

Growing Up Black was written by Lauryn Brown and photographed by Ashley Lorraine Baker.

Strengthen The Hamstring with Active Isolated Stretching

photo of woman doing yoga

Would you like a stronger, more powerful jump? How about a safer landing, a deeper plié, and a greater range of motion in your knees?

Bent Knee Hamstring Exercise with Active Isolated Stretching contributed by Matthew Doolin BA, NMT from A Ballet Magazine’s June Issue.

The knee joint is the most unstable joint in the body. Put at constant torque by ballet dancers, no wonder we are worried about their health and safety. Or maybe you would love a greater range of motion, a more square split, and cleaner penché line. 

This exercise helps to create length in the joint capsule of the knee, stretching not only its hinging action but also its unique rotational aspect. 

Often in ballet, we only stretch turned out and for far too long for our tissue to actually lengthen. After just two seconds, the stretch reflex fires from our body to our mind telling it “we may be in danger, tense up now to avoid injury!” Physiologically, after two seconds of stretching any joint past, the range of motion, our stretch becomes an isometric contraction, similar to holding our plank or developpé a la seconde. The pain we feel from stretching after two seconds is our defense mechanism which in ballet we are taught to ignore. 

By actively engaging the quads, abs, and hip flexors to perform this exercise we are able to effectively stretch the hamstrings and calves without sending a negative message to our tissue. We’re respecting our reflexes, using Sherrington’s Law of Reciprocal Inhibition.

To begin the stretch, lay on your back with your legs outstretched in front of you. Place a non stretch strap, rope, or lead around the sole of the exercising leg’s foot to begin. You may use your hands on the back of the thigh and calf as well. The starting position begins with the knee flexed toward the rib cage and same side shoulder. Contract the quads to fully extend the knee. At the end of the knee movement keep contracted the quadriceps and assist with a rope or your hands. The lower leg should finish over the upper leg without the upper leg moving forward away from the chest. After maintaining a fully stretched knee for two seconds, release back to the starting position. 

In order to assure maximum stretch, a proper angle must be obtained between the thigh and chest and full extension of the knee is attained in each repetition. Release to the starting position of complete knee flexion and gently repeat the exercise moving the legs slightly closer to the chest. 

2 sets of 5 to 10 repetitions recommended, alternating legs after each set.

Repeat the same exercise but wrap the strap around the bottom of the foot and back around from the inside to the outside of the lower leg to create an inward rotation of the shin. Make sure the femur stays neutral and parallel, it is not a complete turn-in of the entire leg.

2 sets of 5 to 10 repetitions recommended, alternating legs after each set.

Repeat the same exercise but wrap the strap around the bottom of the foot and out around from outside to inside of the lower leg to create an outward rotation of the shin. Make sure the femur stays neutral and parallel, it is not a complete turn out of the entire leg.

2 sets of 5 to 10 repetitions recommended, alternating legs after each set.

Do not arch your back, or hike the hip off of the ground surface to compensate for greater stretch. This exercise is about keeping the quadriceps contracted during the entire knee extension as it is creating length in the back of the joint. Relax the ankle, do not strive to point the foot. You do not want to add greater tension to the stretch, but isolate the focus just to the back of the knee. Every time you contract the top thigh muscles, exhale and inhale on the return back to the starting position. Lastly, do not use the strap or your hands to pull your foot closer to your face. That strap is there to add a gentle assisted stretch after your muscles have fully done the action of straightening the knee from a flexed hip.

Matthew Doolin BA, NMT

Matthew Doolin is a Neuromuscular Therapist who specializes in physical rehabilitation, injury and pain management for all. He danced professionally for thirteen years as well as obtained BA from Butler University, two years study to become a medical massage therapist at the National Holistic Institute in San Francisco, and has been practicing Active Isolated Stretching for three three years. He currently lives in Jacksonville, Florida and treats patients online and in person. Please visit his website, IG account, or email him for more information. During this time of crisis Matthew is offering sliding-scale pricing for those interested in taking better care of their facilities or want to break through their physical limitations. 

Www.matthewdoolin.com

Instagram: madmovementherapy

Doolinbodywork@gmail.com

A Ballet Education Relief Fund for Ballet Companies

Dear Friends, Colleagues, Readers and Ballet Lovers…

Ballet is facing a very scary time right now. Companies are running out of money very quickly, and we need, I need your help. There are companies out there now facing the potential of folding… I am asking for your help to donate. And yes, it’s very hard to know which company to help support since every company out there is asking for help. We have started using some of our scholarship money and donating it to companies because if these companies close, we will have nowhere to send our kids. There will be no jobs for them in 3-5 years. I am asking you to look at the bigger picture because it isn’t just the season that is affected, it is going to be a 3-5 or even longer downturn for companies. On October 1, we will announce what companies we will be able to help out and the amounts we are able to help. This is very serious, and it scares me that in 3-5 years there might not be opportunities for any student if we can not keep these companies alive.

And yes, there is the argument that some companies have been mismanaged, or have been racially selective, we want to donate to companies who do thrive on diversity and inclusion. These are the companies that need our help the most. So, if you have a few extra dollars to spare, please feel inclined to donate. It really does scare me what the future of ballet will look like if we don’t have companies to feed.

The September Issue is Here!

The September Issue is here!
Our September Issue here and it is our largest issue ever! Our 20th issue is over 200 pages and the first issue in the history of the Magazine where I did not produce it and I couldn’t be more proud. This issue brings the news that I will be stepping down as Editor-in-Chief and handing over the magazine to Elizabeth Weldon and Ashley Lorraine Baker. The reasoning behind this? I want to make sure that women lead this publication, and that women are being represented in the ballet world as writers, photographers, editors, and are being the voices shaping the conversations in dance. This issue is beyond stunning and I couldn’t have been more proud to see my colleagues (who I am lucky enough to call friends) take control of this issue and produce a beyond stunning issue. We hope you enjoy it! You can read the magazine by subscribing here: www.aballetmagazine.com

Katlyn Addison, Gabrielle Salvatto, Ginabel Peterson, and Jazz Bynum of Ballet West photographed by Joshua Whitehead.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Ginabel Peterson, Jazz Bynum, Katlyn Addison, and Gabrielle Salvatto of Ballet West photographed by Joshua Whitehead.

COVER STORY
WOMEN: THE FUTURE: When the staff of A Ballet Magazine began brainstorming for our September issue,  the immediate thought that came to my mind was to feature these four beautiful women at Ballet West.: Gabrielle Salvatto Katlyn Addison, Jazz Khai Bynum, and Ginabel Peterson. Read an in-depth article and interview by Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Weldon photographed by Joshua Whitehead. 

Growing Up Black: Lauryn Brown Photographed by Ashley Baker

GROWING UP BLACK
By Lauryn Brown | Photographed by Ashley Baker
When I was younger, kids in my ballet class were awarded stickers for coming to class in the proper uniform with their hair in a neat ballet bun. My mom arranged my thick natural hair into individual braids that were nicely pulled back for class, however, I was the only girl who did not get a sticker for being in the proper uniform. I was always told my hair was not right for class. Read more of Lauryn’s personal essay.

DO THEY SEE US?
By Ashley Baker
Creating quality ballet choreography can come from anyone and anywhere. Ballet seems to be lacking in finding, or better yet, uncovering black women who choreograph ballet. Where are all the black female choreographers? Amy Hall Garner and Claudia Schreier unpack being choreographers, being black, and being women. 

THE VIOLENCE OF WHITE SILENCE
By Elizabeth Weldon
In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, and the surge of Black Lives Matter protests worldwide, ballet dancers of color have taken to their social media accounts as a platform to express disappointment in their employers. One of the first of these dancers was George Sanders.

THE POINTE OF PIGMENT
Written and Photographed Ashley Baker
Some of the world’s top pointe shoe companies share in their mission to better represent the community that uses their products. This article features Freed of London, Suffolk, and Gaynor Minden. We had the chance to sit down and talk with the owners of these companies and talk about their contributions in providing pointe shoes of color. 

MASTER TEACHER
By David King
My first introduction to Andrea Long wasn’t in person. And no, it wasn’t because of the Covid-19 pandemic. My first introduction to Andrea Long was in 1993, sitting inside the local cineplex at six years old. Now, I have the privilege of calling this master teacher my friend. Here is a feature on this stunning and talented teacher.

#ABESONESTOWATCH
NEW FEATURE: Each issue A Ballet Education and A Ballet Magazine will be selecting up and coming ballet dancers to be featured in the issue! We are kicking off this feature with six talented young women who are breaking onto the ballet scene with a punch. Featuring Maddison Brown, Adeline Dunlap, Bella Jones, Alexandra Owens, Destiny Wimpye, and Sasha Manuel.   

FALL FASHION: COLOR BLOCKING
Written and Photographed Ashley Baker featuring Mia Patton and styled by Berly Baray

STYLE: HERE’S TO HAIR
Written by Ashley Baker featuring Alexandra Terry

RESILIENCE & REPRESENTATION a profile on KIYON ROSS
Written by Eric Hipolito Jr.

AZ DANCE MED TAKES YOU THROUGH HELPFUL EXERCISES TO  PROMOTE A MOBILE AND SUPPORTED SPINE

RESOURCES: WHEN WILL IT BE WOMEN’S TURN?
Written by Jillian Verzwyvelt artwork by Ashley Baker 

PROFILE: DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM
STEPHANIE RAE WILLIAMS
Written by Isabella Costantino

PROFILE: PAVIELLE VERSALLES: THE WOMAN BEHIND CONCEPT PAVIELLE

AND MUCH MORE!

The Reinvention of Ballet

COVID has taken over almost every aspect of our lives. Our jobs, the way we interact with people, the news, and so on. While COVID has completely destroyed some aspects of ballet, ballet has found a way to reinvent itself: The Digital Performance. While I have a lot of problems with digital teaching, and that watching digitally broadcast performances is not the same as attending live performances… there are a lot of things I love about this new era.

I love that ballet is becoming more accessible to the masses with free performances. I love being able to fast forward, pause, and replay. I love being able to watch it in my bed, in my pajamas and eating. I love being able to talk during a performance. And most of all, I like being able to talk to colleagues and friends about the same exact performance. 

But what I really love, what I love more than anything right now, are all of these new video performances that take ballet and dance to another level. Combining amazing videography, and collaborations have allowed us to see dancers we may not normally see or feature dancers that most artistic directors would not feature. If you are catching my drift…

These videos are most likely going to become a part of the future of ballet, and truthfully, I love it.  

So here are some of the amazing digital performances that I am kind of obsessed with right now- Enjoy.

View this post on Instagram

shot by @jacobjonasthecompany

A post shared by Emma Rosenzweig-Bock (@emmaarielle) on

This is just nice to watch…

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT ALL OF THE AMAZING ABE PRODUCTS OUT NOW!!

Subscribe to the magazine!

FREE NEW COLORING PAGES

Another Free Coloring Page from The Sleeping Beauty. If you haven’t ordered your August Planner, please do. We are running out. The August Planner’s theme is the Sleeping Beauty!