The September Issue is Here!

The September Issue is here!
Our September Issue here and it is our largest issue ever! Our 20th issue is over 200 pages and the first issue in the history of the Magazine where I did not produce it and I couldn’t be more proud. This issue brings the news that I will be stepping down as Editor-in-Chief and handing over the magazine to Elizabeth Weldon and Ashley Lorraine Baker. The reasoning behind this? I want to make sure that women lead this publication, and that women are being represented in the ballet world as writers, photographers, editors, and are being the voices shaping the conversations in dance. This issue is beyond stunning and I couldn’t have been more proud to see my colleagues (who I am lucky enough to call friends) take control of this issue and produce a beyond stunning issue. We hope you enjoy it! You can read the magazine by subscribing here: www.aballetmagazine.com

Katlyn Addison, Gabrielle Salvatto, Ginabel Peterson, and Jazz Bynum of Ballet West photographed by Joshua Whitehead.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Ginabel Peterson, Jazz Bynum, Katlyn Addison, and Gabrielle Salvatto of Ballet West photographed by Joshua Whitehead.

COVER STORY
WOMEN: THE FUTURE: When the staff of A Ballet Magazine began brainstorming for our September issue,  the immediate thought that came to my mind was to feature these four beautiful women at Ballet West.: Gabrielle Salvatto Katlyn Addison, Jazz Khai Bynum, and Ginabel Peterson. Read an in-depth article and interview by Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Weldon photographed by Joshua Whitehead. 

Growing Up Black: Lauryn Brown Photographed by Ashley Baker

GROWING UP BLACK
By Lauryn Brown | Photographed by Ashley Baker
When I was younger, kids in my ballet class were awarded stickers for coming to class in the proper uniform with their hair in a neat ballet bun. My mom arranged my thick natural hair into individual braids that were nicely pulled back for class, however, I was the only girl who did not get a sticker for being in the proper uniform. I was always told my hair was not right for class. Read more of Lauryn’s personal essay.

DO THEY SEE US?
By Ashley Baker
Creating quality ballet choreography can come from anyone and anywhere. Ballet seems to be lacking in finding, or better yet, uncovering black women who choreograph ballet. Where are all the black female choreographers? Amy Hall Garner and Claudia Schreier unpack being choreographers, being black, and being women. 

THE VIOLENCE OF WHITE SILENCE
By Elizabeth Weldon
In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, and the surge of Black Lives Matter protests worldwide, ballet dancers of color have taken to their social media accounts as a platform to express disappointment in their employers. One of the first of these dancers was George Sanders.

THE POINTE OF PIGMENT
Written and Photographed Ashley Baker
Some of the world’s top pointe shoe companies share in their mission to better represent the community that uses their products. This article features Freed of London, Suffolk, and Gaynor Minden. We had the chance to sit down and talk with the owners of these companies and talk about their contributions in providing pointe shoes of color. 

MASTER TEACHER
By David King
My first introduction to Andrea Long wasn’t in person. And no, it wasn’t because of the Covid-19 pandemic. My first introduction to Andrea Long was in 1993, sitting inside the local cineplex at six years old. Now, I have the privilege of calling this master teacher my friend. Here is a feature on this stunning and talented teacher.

#ABESONESTOWATCH
NEW FEATURE: Each issue A Ballet Education and A Ballet Magazine will be selecting up and coming ballet dancers to be featured in the issue! We are kicking off this feature with six talented young women who are breaking onto the ballet scene with a punch. Featuring Maddison Brown, Adeline Dunlap, Bella Jones, Alexandra Owens, Destiny Wimpye, and Sasha Manuel.   

FALL FASHION: COLOR BLOCKING
Written and Photographed Ashley Baker featuring Mia Patton and styled by Berly Baray

STYLE: HERE’S TO HAIR
Written by Ashley Baker featuring Alexandra Terry

RESILIENCE & REPRESENTATION a profile on KIYON ROSS
Written by Eric Hipolito Jr.

AZ DANCE MED TAKES YOU THROUGH HELPFUL EXERCISES TO  PROMOTE A MOBILE AND SUPPORTED SPINE

RESOURCES: WHEN WILL IT BE WOMEN’S TURN?
Written by Jillian Verzwyvelt artwork by Ashley Baker 

PROFILE: DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM
STEPHANIE RAE WILLIAMS
Written by Isabella Costantino

PROFILE: PAVIELLE VERSALLES: THE WOMAN BEHIND CONCEPT PAVIELLE

AND MUCH MORE!

The Future of Ballet…. Adele ‘All I Ask’

So it has hit the world of Social Media by storm, but I thought I would post about it as well. DJ Smart (SYTYCD, Koresh Dance Company)  and Zola Williams with Choreography by Will B Bell and edited by Jose Omar Hernandez. With over half a million views, it brings to light the changing of color and ethnicity in ballet. I recently posted on facebook a statement that caused a lot of controversy via private messages and public posts.

“I’m not trying to say anything racial or political, but for some reason I just truly believe that ethnic ballet dancers have so much more to give with a stronger purpose. ‪#‎thatsall‬

The nature of ballet needs to diversify, and at a faster rate than artistic directors can grasp. As Misty Copeland has really put a face to ethnic dancing, and as Dance Magazine diversified their top 25 to watch this year; more dancers of this caliber should be celebrated not as commercial dancers but truly be identified as ballet dancers. They deserve it.

Here is why I made the comment that I did: As an ethnic dancer you have to dance 10 times better than a white ballet dancer. Not only do you have to prove you are just technically as good as them, but you have something else in addition to. The argument is that you will stick out in the corps, so you have to possess something that will get you promoted. You have to be tenacious, you have to go through this ridiculous mental struggle of race and your reflection. I know I did. I am not saying that ethnic ballet dancers are better, I am saying that the ethnic dancers that do make it in ballet because they have gone through such a journey with their racial profile; something you can not change. I have seen amazingly trained ethnic dancers not get jobs, or get so discouraged in the ballet world that they leave and move onto other things because of race. So, when videos like this come at such a diverse collaboration it warms my heart. And I hope one day, we look at dancers and just say they are dancers, and don’t have to identify their racial profile. Until then, they are finding new ways to present their art, soul and journey.


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/150746445″>&quot;All I Ask&quot; -Adele | Will B. Bell Choreography</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/willbbell1″>Will B. Bell</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>